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20130103
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
arrived in new york one of the first things he did was to talk about international copyright law. he felt that writers were being cheated himself among them of their due earnings because copyright editors side with publishers. there was no international copyright law ever in america. his books were endlessly reprinted without him getting a penny. this was regarded... his statement on this was regarded as outrageous but the american press who denounced him instantly and said if that's all you've got to say go home. we don't want to know. we don't want you coming here and lecturing us on this. they believed that you could download anything from the internet free. the man had written a book and it was in the public domain. >> freedom is very interesting there because in some sense what he hated about america, what the people made too free with him this was the great land of opportunity, the great land of freedom. the grate democratic experiment. yet people were perhaps a little too familiar with hip. them didn't... he didn't like the fact that they treated him as an equal. that's very strang
. this was 1999 and i was like, well most of my friends miserable at their desk jobs working in sweet or law and i'm going to pursue something that i at least enjoy doing, and that was cooking. >> rose: you liked it? >> i liked it. >> rose: what did you like about it? >> that you could work with something and get better at it and sort of just taste and -- you're creating something, using your hands. it's something that was just the direct polar opposite of what i was doing in college or what i was being groomed to do which i had no idea. cooking was something i felt i had had an honor in. it was like a real craft. if i had more dexterity i would have been like a -- i don't know, a cooper or something like that. >> rose: or a surgeon. >> yeah, a surgeon. >> rose: (laughs) >> so you're -- you went about cooking and you got a series of jobs, including japan. >> yes. >> rose: and how influential was that? >> it was life changing. life changing. >> rose: life changing. >> yeah. i had a small stint teaching english in japan and i promised myself i'd go back to japan to do it right and to absorb the food
, went to law school at night, the whole bit. he wanted me to be a lawyer. so i said well, we owe $2,000, when i get out i'll owe $2,000, so i said let me get a job. so i got a job, my coach at brown was a coach at brown, took the job at penn state, so i went down there with him, i was going to go two years. i got caught up in coaching. i called up and i said dad, i'm gonna coach. you're gonna coach? what did you go to college for? >> rose: (laughs) >> and i said well i think i can do a good job. he said well you make sure you have an impact. he said don't waste your time. >> rose: how long were you ace sis tonight to rick? >> 16 years. >> rose: 16 years? >> yup. i had started to work at penn state before i even graduated brown. in those days we used to have two weeks of reading for the final exams and the wholexd bit and senior paper and that kind of stuff. and i was a decent student so i was able to get down there and i worked for a week at penn state before i graduated brown and i stayed there for the rest of my life. >> it's so interesting because the reverberations of this remar
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)